Pet Vaccinations: Increased Protection Against Disease

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Vaccines have helped humans overcome a variety of diseases that were once a threat to their survival. Today, vaccines continue to protect countless people against infection, but people are not the only ones who benefit from this protection. Without vaccinations, our pets are vulnerable to diseases like rabies, distemper, and parvo, which are very dangerous. To prevent the spread of these diseases and keep your pets healthy, Festival Animal Clinic in Centennial offers core and lifestyle vaccines for dogs and cats.

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How Do Vaccines Protect My Pet?

Pet vaccinations work just like human vaccines. They increase immunity to harmful diseases by stimulating antibody production in the immune system. Antibodies are important proteins designed to counteract antigens (foreign substances) and prevent infection. Routine vaccination ensures that your pet’s immunity remains strong throughout their life.

Pet Vaccinations in Centennial: Owner Cuddles With Pets

What Vaccines We Provide

Core vaccines are the most important vaccinations your pet can receive. They protect against highly lethal diseases and are required by state law.

Pet Vaccinations in Centennial: Vet Gives Cat Wellness Exam

Core Vaccines for Dogs

  • Rabies vaccine: This vaccine should be given when your pet is at least 12 weeks old.
  • Distemper-parvo combination vaccine (DA2PP): Protects dogs from several different viruses and must be given as a series, starting when puppies are 6-8 weeks old. Boosters should be given every 3-4 weeks until the puppy is about 16 weeks old.

Non-Core Vaccines for Dogs

  • Bordetella: This vaccine can prevent or reduce the symptoms of kennel cough.
  • Leptospirosis: The leptospirosis vaccine protects against the leptospirosis virus, found in soil and standing bodies of water.

Core Vaccines for Cats

  • Rabies vaccine: Kittens should be vaccinated for rabies at about 12 weeks old.
  • FVRCP (feline distemper and upper respiratory) vaccine: This combination vaccine must be given in a series, with each booster being administered 3-4 weeks apart until the kitten is 16 weeks old.

Non-Core Vaccines for Cats

  • FeLV (feline leukemia): All kittens should be vaccinated for feline leukemia. If you plan on them becoming an outdoor cat, they should be vaccinated regularly for this disease as they will be at a higher risk of infection.

Keep Your Pet Protected

Please contact us if your pet is due for their vaccinations or needs to get started with their booster shots. Together we will create a long-term vaccination schedule that meets your pet’s most important health requirements to help them live a longer, healthier life.

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